Skip OSU and Dentistry navigation, view page content
The Ohio State University College of Dentistry  
    

Predoctoral Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health

Predoctoral Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health
- Program Description
- Curriculum
- Facilities
- Faculty

The Predoctoral program in Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health introduces our dental students to the management of oral health and the diagnosis of dental disease in infants, children, adolescents and patients with special medical needs.
The pre-doctoral experience is divided into three “phases” of education emphasizing clinical relevance;

I. Pre-clinical
During the sophomore (D2) year, dental students are enrolled in Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health 551, which provides an introduction to basic restorative dentistry for the primary and transitional dentition. Topics covered include;
a. Overview of restorative dentistry
b. Pulp Therapy
c. Posterior Resin Restorations and Sealants
d. Treatment Planning (Discussion groups)

The dental students also participate in a laboratory curriculum which aims to translate the theoretical principles of restorative dentistry to typodont-based exercises and practical exams. The laboratory course establishes the foundation which allows the students to progress to the next phase;

II. Clinical Introduction
In the fall of the junior (D3), dental students are enrolled in Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health 651, which introduces topics elemental in the practice of everyday dentistry for infants, children, adolescents and patients with special medical needs. Topics are presented in a developmental fashion to promote a comprehensive approach to treatment planning and delivery of compassionate and efficient care. Topics covered include;
a. Child Development
b. Infant Oral Health
c. Adolescent Dentistry
d. Fluoride (Parts I and II)
e. Oral Hygiene and Prevention
f. Clinical Examination of Children
g. Child Abuse and Neglect
h. Pediatric Radiology
i. Common Pediatric Health Problems
j. Treatment Planning in the Primary, Mixed and Permanent Dentition
k. Behavior Management (Parts I and II)
l. Pediatric Pain Control: Local Anesthesia and Nitrous Oxide
m. Pediatric Oral Pathology
n. Pediatric Periodontal Problems
o. Developmental Disabilities (Parts I, II and III)
p. Traumatic Injuries (Parts I, II and III)


During the junior (D3) year, dental students also begin rotating through the Pediatric Pre-doctoral Clinical Experience, where they begin to apply the didactic material presented in lecture-based courses to clinical situtations involving infants, children, adolescents and patients with special healthcare needs. The Ohio State University College of Dentistry Section of Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health is located on the 1st floor and encompasses five dental chairs. Dental students treat all ages of patients, under the careful guidance of our attending faculty. There is also an emphasis on four-handed dentistry and the utilization of assistants in the management of children within the dental setting.
Dental students are instructed in the use of various behavior management techniques, including nitrous oxide. An example of layered mentoring occurs when the predoctoral dental students get to assist the postdoctoral pediatric dental residents in oral rehabilitation of pediatric dentitions under general anesthesia and nitrous oxide.
The skills in basic diagnosis, growth and development and behavior management serve to aid the students to the next phase. Student competence and proficiency are examined throughout the rotation.


III. Community-based clinical Pediatric Dentistry and Community Oral Health
As the student’s clinical proficiency reaches the next level, they begin to leave the confines of the OSU Pediatric clinic and experience extramural rotations, some as part of the OHIO project. These clinical rotations in the senior (D4) year include;

a. Nationwide Children’s Hospital
b. The Ohio State University Dental HOME coach
c. The Nisonger Center
d. The Johnstown Clinic

These rotations enhance the dental student’s exposure to clinical dentistry for infants, children, adolescents and patients with special medical needs. The D4 program also promotes an understanding of how vital community dentistry can be in underserved communities and populations.
The students assimilation of previous didactic material and clinical situations is assessed through a mandatory Capstone Competency, given as a web-based examination.